Community

Newfoundland is one of the many communities known for its proximity to the sea and for being the perfect place to retire and spend your senior years. This is great for you if you're into history or heritage and you want a reasonably priced home with a view of the water. However, the trade off is that high winds, fierce winter storms, and historic construction methods can lead to some expensive problems. Whenever you're buying a home in St. John's you always want a home inspector to vet the property before the deal is sealed. Here are just a few of the things they'll be looking for.

If there is anyone who is adept at defect recognition, it's a home inspector. St John's homes have the potential for a few types of defects you won't see everywhere. For example, when the home inspector is looking over the foundation, there is a possibility that erosion from being too close to the sea during stormy weather will have cracked, undercut, or even worn away some of the foundation, causing instability and leaks. Salt spray can also weather and rot wood more quickly than normal rain, so your inspector may inform you that the home's exterior shingles will need to be replaced within a few years.

There aren't many problems with termites or cockroaches in St. John's, but pests like squirrels and mice may take up residence inside your walls during the harsh winters. Your inspector will check for that and test the effectiveness of your home's central heating system, which you will need during the winters. The heavy snowfalls that Newfoundland experiences can take its toll on roof and home structures, so rest assured that your inspector will make sure everything is still sound. All told, the inspection should take three to five hours, and at the end of it you will have a multi-page run down on the condition of every facet of your new home.




Copyright (c) 2008 -